jordanrosenfeld

Can Twitter Go Literary?

In General on June 27, 2009 at 2:15 am

An item in my Funds for Writers newsletter today suggested that Twitter might actually be a forum to promote quality writing.  I like to think that anything “published” on Twitter would be condensed down to a perfect essence, therefore encouraging quality. We’ll see, though.

The following forums are paying for writing on Twitter:

Nanoism (@nanoism)
http://nanoism.net/submit : $1.50 for unpublished literary
fiction; $1 for reprints; $5 for serials

Thaumatrope (@thaumatrope)
http://thaumatrope.greententacles.com/submissions : $1.20
per science fiction/fantasy/horror entry and currently needs
serials
Tweet the Meat (@tweetthemeat)
http://tweetthemeat.blogspot.com/2009/04/submission-guidelines.html 
Horror/weird/speculative, pays $1 per tweet

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  1. I enjoy short stories and flash fiction, but I thought 6S was testing the boundaries of mini-fiction. “Stories” in 140 characters. A beginning, end, and denouement? I think we’ll se a lot of snapshots-in-time, philosophy and maybe even the odd joke or two, but actual “stories” might be few and far between.

    Thanks for the lead though. Who knows when one might come up with the perfect Twitter story, it goes viral and next thing you know you’ve got a book deal.

    –John

  2. I think whether or not you’d consider the shortest stories as true stories would depend on if you subscribe only to that very traditional view of the story or if you are more open to looser interpretations. I’ve always personally liked the idea that a story requires that the main character change–at least in some small way–from beginning to end.

    As Norton is now publishing a “hint fiction” anthology of stories 25 words and under, I’d argue that the best of nanofiction doesn’t have to literally include a beginning, middle, and end–but must hint at them, give the reader the context necessary to fill in the gaps in a satisfying manner–just as the Hemingway 6 word classic.

    Oh, and just fyi: the highest paying market is Outshine–$5 per prose poem.

    • Ben I definitely think there’s literary merit to the shorties! I’m open 🙂

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